Tag Archives: calling

The best job search news I ever hated: Registering clues to your life’s passion.

“He said you had no passion for it,” my dad told me, hanging up the phone. He had just gotten a call from a friend who had interviewed me for a mechanical engineering position earlier that day.

The news hit me like a punch to the gut. Would I ever get a job? Would I ever get a second interview? I had been out of work for two years since getting my Master’s in Mechanical Engineering, I was in my mid-twenties and living with my parents because I couldn’t support myself financially without a job, and I was wondering if it would ever end.

Why didn’t I have a job? Why wasn’t I getting past the first interview with anyone? I was so good at math and science! And my dad was an engineer! Surely that was the field for me, too?

But no. That career was going nowhere. No passion. Was that the reason? No other interviewer had ever told me why they weren’t asking me back. But, thanks to this call (which I thank God for moving the interviewer to make—and the man himself for making it), I finally had a clue that maybe I was chasing the wrong career.

Now, it didn’t happen overnight (not even close), but I eventually moved my focus to writing—where I most definitely do have a passion. And I am pursuing that, in both fiction and nonfiction, in both a novel and in helping job seekers get their interviews by bringing their skills, values, and other strengths dramatically to life for prospective employers through great resumes and cover letters with my business, TedStoriesThatSell.com. And, as a result, I am finding some success and peace. (And I’m out of my parents’ house, too!)

I’m still building toward that level of writing success God purposed me for, but I am already benefitting from pursuing it. So I urge you to seek that passion in your own career and to pay close attention to the clues you receive about the field you are meant for.

 

Ted Perrotti, Founder

Stories that Sell (TedStoriesThatSell.com)

 

Keywords: career growth